Events

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

Unique Experiences

Take a step back in time, over 200 years ago, with the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association. See, touch, taste, and smell what fall offers to the settlers. Members of the Association will be dressed in period attire providing on-going demonstrations that guests can take part in. The demonstrations include learning how clothing was made from breaking flax to spinning wool. See how candles were made from bees wax. If it is cool outside, stand by the salt pot fire and maybe you will have an opportunity to stir the pot. Do not forget to hang-out with the blacksmith to see his new creation. This is a great program for families. The program is free and stop by any time you would like between 1-5 p.m.

Event is free, but there is a parking fee of $4.

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

Wilderness Road Blockhouse

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

Wilderness Road Blockhouse

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

Wilderness Road Blockhouse

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com

Wilderness Road Blockhouse

The Blockhouse was built in the spring of 1775 on the North Fork of the Holston River by John Anderson. His fortified home became a landmark along the road west, the Wilderness Road, which was marked by Daniel Bonne and 30 ax men. Over the next thirty years, some 300,000 people passed Anderson’s home on their journey through the Cumberland Gap and on into what would become the state of Kentucky, and further westward. Tour a replica of the Anderson Blockhouse as members of the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail Association provide information about the history of the building and area. Discover who John Anderson was and why his home was important to the frontier. This is a free program open to everyone. No pets allowed inside of the Blockhouse. For more information about the association visit http://www.danielboonetrail.com